Comment 92321

By hshields (registered) - website | Posted September 19, 2013 at 12:19:41 in reply to Comment 92314

This post makes complete sense. However, to play devil's advocate, I see where city staff planners are coming from and the rationale for taking their position. On the City's Rapid Transit website, the first thing you see is economic benefits. The first item is this: "Increasing land value by - 8 to 14 percent within 800m of the line and particularly within close proximity to station areas."

This item is immediately followed by, "Increasing assessment value – high value, high density, mixed use land parcels can produce higher assessment which help to pay for the capital and operating costs of the system." I would assume they are still talking about the 800 metres when talking about assessment value increases.

The Rapid Transit websites goes into a whole bunch of other goodies for Hamilton like Jobs, Growth, urban investment, less pollution etc... However, if you look at fact #1, it is all predicated on being within this 800 metres of the corridor.

South of York to King and from Dundurn to Queen is right smack within that 800 metres. BTW, it hasn't been clear if the City means 400 m on either side of the right of way or 800 m on either side but that's beside the point. The point is, the City has overriding strategies in mind, they have a larger framework they are working with and they won't be changing their course, providing exemptions to the rule at this stage.

I'm sorry Strathcona, with LRT comes amazing opportunities but also potential changes to the character, and cost, of your neighbourhood the City has already put into place.

Ironically, because of LRT, property assessment will significantly increase and those lovely, well kept century homes will quickly become unaffordable for those on fixed or modest incomes to maintain their property tax. Many will be forced to sell and developers will be more than happy to purchase. It's like Muskoka but in your own backyard.

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