Comment 84114

By Sigma Cub (anonymous) | Posted December 18, 2012 at 16:52:00

Absolute Towers make the cover of the latest CTBUH Journal...

https://store.ctbuh.org/PDF_Previews/Journal/CTBUHJournal_2012-4.pdf


... and they get a half-hour love-up as well:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=9xWZuZfYPvw


There's also an interesting piece in there about the explosive rise of Canadian skyscraper development. Some crazy stats on TO: By 2015, Toronto will be home to 44 highrises taller than 150m, compared to 13 skyscrapers of that scale in 2005.

Sample:

Canada is in the midst of a tall building boom. Twenty six buildings taller than 150 meters have been built in Canada since 2005, according to a new research study by the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat.

Canada added four buildings taller than 200 meters in 2012, the most Canada has ever completed in a single year, the CTBUH study found. In contrast the United States completed two building over 200 meters in 2012.

The epicenter of Canadian tall building development is Toronto, where 15 buildings taller than 150 meters are under construction, more than any other city in the western hemisphere. Toronto is projected to have 44 buildings taller than 150 meters by 2015, up from 13 in 2005.

But Toronto is not alone. Vancouver and Calgary are also growing taller. By the end of 2015 the number of buildings in Canada taller than 150 meters is expected to increase to 74, up from 26 in 1995, according to the CTBUH study.

“Canada is reshaping its urban centers and tall buildings are playing a large role,” said Dr. Antony Wood, Executive Director of the CTBUH. “Canada is at the forefront of discussions about density, transportation and urban sustainability.”

The development in Canada also reflects a global shift in the fundamental role of tall buildings around the world. In 2001, 26 of the 27 buildings taller than 150 meters in Canada were office or hotel buildings; today 15 of the 17 buildings taller than 150 meters currently under construction are entirely or partially residential. Eight of the 9 buildings taller than 150 meters completed in Canada in 2012 featured a residential component.

All five of the towers taller than 200 meters under construction in Toronto are residential.

http://www.ctbuh.org/Publications/Journal/InNumbers/TBINCanadaRising/tabid/4080/language/en-US/Default.aspx

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