Comment 113756

By mdrejhon (registered) - website | Posted September 03, 2015 at 15:07:29 in reply to Comment 113749

Apparently, the credit link I was trying to insert, apparently didn't get in the above post: http://www.citylab.com/commute/2015/04/t... This is where I got the image from.

The cycling boom in New York City has been phenomenal in the last 10 years. I wonder if City of Hamilton is collecting enough annual bike data for this city to be able to create graphs like the above.

I continue to collect bike traffic data (via video) at a specific location (Cannon and Wentworth). BTW, whenever I drive near the Cannon & Wentworth (or walk or bike near the area), and have spare time, I park to collect a 10-minute video. Right now I have about 5 roadside videos of nearly the same roadside spot at Cannon (10 mins long each, at different times in the last few weeks). For Cannon road surface allocation the most recent video during a weather threat (rain) achieved a not-bad bike ratio of approximately ~0.15 (equality: 0.33; since the road surface is 3:1 allocation car:bike) after 7pm September 2nd where there was a scant 52 cars and 7 bikes crossing an exact point of Cannon near Wentworth over a 10 minute time period. The 1-to-1.5-minute dead silence on Cannon between stoplight cycles between the car platoon surges, definitely keeps the car count down lower than an automobile driver would think. I observed at least 5+ other bikes that went into the video scene but did not cross the crossing point I was focussing on. If I counted all visible moving cars/bikes in the visible frame, the bike ratio dramatically improves, since many bikes turn onto/off the Cannon lanes at Wentworth, and the bike ratio (bikes:cars) is higher in different parts of the video frame! I additionally make the observation that many cars drive a larger length of Cannon, while many bikes ride for a span of fewer blocks, including bike that turned before crossing the crossing point in my video, so the bike ratio may actually be more favorable than it really is, because of the different use patterns.

Comment edited by mdrejhon on 2015-09-03 15:20:19

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