Comment 105866

By jason (registered) | Posted November 03, 2014 at 09:32:10 in reply to Comment 105863

it's the Hamilton mindset. There are some local neighbourhood traffic calming elements being installed in the North End and the CHML crowd is flipping their lid (even though none of them live there) because they can't close their eyes and do 60km anymore like they're used to.

Check out the traffic calming measures the city of Portland is out actively looking to implement city-wide:

https://www.portlandoregon.gov/transport...

Specific to your point about Westdale and Strathcona, I LOVE the use in other cities of mid-block bumpouts or choke points to cause traffic to defer to one another. In other words, a street wide enough for two-way traffic to pass each other is narrowed so only one car can pass at a time, slowing everyone down.

http://www.ouruptown.com/2012/04/traffic...

This is done in every city I've ever been to, except Hamilton of course.

Yet we have this exact design on the Westdale, Strathcona streets you mention due to their narrow width. And shockingly, the economy hasn't come to an end because cars need to stop and politely defer to one another in a residential neighbourhood.

I know on my street I'd love to see bumpouts, no entry from Queen N (90% of traffic on our street is short-cutters from Queen to Locke to King. Apparently the Queen frwy isn't fast enough for them). And I'd like to see parking alternate blocks instead of being on the same side the entire street. Currently parking is allowed 24-7 on the north side. It should be north side for a block, then south side for a block, then north side for a block.

This is a great overview of how simple and nice it is to calm neighbourhood streets.

http://ladotbikeblog.wordpress.com/2011/...

A great post showing how simple and cheap curb parking can be used as traffic calming. Scroll down to the section on chicanes using only blue paint to stagger the parking: http://www.streetfilms.org/a-30km-slow-z...

Comment edited by jason on 2014-11-03 09:41:24

Permalink | Context

Events Calendar

Recent Articles

Article Archives

Blog Archives

Site Tools

Feeds