Articles in Reviews

Cast: Art and Objects Made Using Humanity's Most Transformational Process
The mission of this book is to re-establish an appreciation of the casting process, past and present, and they take the reader on a whirlwind tour of history and materials to do it.
by Margaret Lindsay Holton
Published August 18, 2017 in Reviews (5 comments)

Review: All's Well by John Lefebvre
This book challenges our sense of ethics: who is ultimately responsible for Justice and Liberty? Is it simply existing laws or is it us responsible for shaping those laws?
by Margaret Lindsay Holton
Published July 05, 2017 in Reviews (3 comments)

Review: Tara Bursey and Aaron Murphy, Two-Person Show at you me gallery
Bursey is an interdisciplinary artist whose work is heavily rooted in nature, while Murphy builds digital montages from a large collection of images he has created and acquired.
by Mackenzie Kristjon Jenkyns
Published June 27, 2017 in Reviews (0 comments)

Review: Canadada: Take Two
Released in time to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Constitution Act, this album tugs on the messy cultural threads that collectively make up the Canadian tapestry.
by Ryan McGreal
Published June 26, 2017 in Reviews (4 comments)

Review: Sunset Blvd. The Musical
All in all, an engaging evening of theatre with clever scenic design, lighting and beautiful costumes enhancing the music and song.
by Daniel Gariépy
Published May 08, 2017 in Reviews (0 comments)

Review: Return Engagements
A lively story performed by a valiant cast is complicated by the inexplicable choice to narrate the entire play with its stage directions.
by Daniel Gariépy
Published April 21, 2017 in Reviews (0 comments)

Review: McMaster Musical Theatre's Production of Pippin
Director Matt Moore and his talented cast and crew have laboured to produce a spontaneous, theatre-of-the-moment experience that engages the audience from its opening seconds.
by Daniel Gariépy
Published March 01, 2017 in Reviews (0 comments)

Hamilton Aerial Group's La Nuit du Frisson
An elaborate, otherworldly ritual both thrilling and mysterious, this cabaret combined majestic costumes, music and poetry with fantastic aerial dance performances.
by Mackenzie Kristjon Jenkyns
Published February 14, 2017 in Reviews (2 comments)

Review: It's Only a Play
In her directorial debut at the Guild, Moe Dwyer has, with her tight and focused direction, deep understanding of comedy and snappy pacing, secured herself a chair of honour at the director's table for years to come.
by Daniel Gariépy
Published February 09, 2017 in Reviews (0 comments)

Artist Frida Kahlo's Blood Bath Enshrined at Casa Azul
Hailed by some as a feminist for her fearless autobiographical and brutal depictions of personal pain, there is no question that the rich European and Mezo-American cultures in which she lived and breathed shaped and informed her wider world vision.
by Margaret Lindsay Holton
Published January 16, 2017 in Reviews (0 comments)

Othella's Revenge
With a Shakespearian subversion, Esther Huh has turned Othello on his old head.
by Kevin Somers
Published April 15, 2016 in Reviews (1 comment)

Veracious Life Productions Presents Dearest Diary
The surprisingly funny and poignant performances were not over-long and were genuinely different from each other, making it a very enjoyable evening.
by Mackenzie Kristjon Jenkyns
Published April 11, 2016 in Reviews (0 comments)

Review: Sonoluminesence Trio and Dave Gould at Art Gallery of Hamilton
The music was incredibly rich, nuanced and lively, and the musicians exhibited a palpable rapport, carefully tuned into each other to improvise music that sounded at once assured and exploratory.
by Ryan McGreal
Published March 21, 2016 in Reviews (1 comment)

Review: Crackle Pop by Juliana LaChance
After repeated listens, this synthy, dreamlike album unfolds like a secret you're not supposed to know.
by Mackenzie Kristjon Jenkyns
Published March 04, 2016 in Reviews (0 comments)

Book Review: Happy City by Charles Montgomery
Happy cities are cities where urban transportation infrastructure puts people first, mitigates the effects of social inequality and respects the dignity of every human being.
by Kevin Love
Published February 09, 2016 in Reviews (12 comments)

Highway's A Tale of Monstrous Extravagance: Imagining Multilingualism
Tomson Highway, a genius musician and outstanding thinker, shares a complex and edifying reflection on language and experience, narratives that entertain, surprise and inspire.
by Jonathan Lambert
Published December 21, 2015 in Reviews (0 comments)

He Named Me Malala and the Art Gallery of Hamilton's ilovefilmseries
With community partner South Asian Heritage Association of Hamilton and Region, the Art Gallery of Hamilton presented another impressive documentary at Jackson Square.
by Jonathan Lambert
Published December 11, 2015 in Reviews (0 comments)

Preview: Borderline Me by Robin Zee
The version of this one-woman play being presented at the Spice Factory will be different from previous performances and definitely worth a second look.
by Mackenzie Kristjon Jenkyns
Published November 24, 2015 in Reviews (0 comments)

Review: Spirit of the Narrows
In an age of American Idol and almost pre-fab music learning, it was refreshing to take a more in-depth look at another spirit of cultural learning and exploration.
by Mackenzie Kristjon Jenkyns
Published November 23, 2015 in Reviews (2 comments)

Review: Lake Road Restaurant
The food, service and atmosphere are uniformly excellent: playful, delicious and highly attentive.
by Ryan McGreal
Published November 02, 2015 in Reviews (4 comments)

Review of Toronto: Transformations In A City And Its Region (Part 2)
Can we achieve additive, not subtractive, reurbanization, and retain the mass, variety, and cohesion of a 'real city'?
by Shawn Selway
Published September 29, 2015 in Reviews (0 comments)

Review of Toronto: Transformations In A City And Its Region (Part 1)
Edward Relph is a genial, open-hearted observer who takes pride in Toronto's transformation from the inward-looking second city of Canada to the polyglot world city that provides something for everybody.
by Shawn Selway
Published September 28, 2015 in Reviews (0 comments)

Review: Lunch-Bucket Lives
Heron's new book offers plenty of fascinating detail into the experiences of working class people in Canada's largest industrial centre during a period of tremendous social and cultural upheaval between the 1890s and the 1940s.
by Paul Weinberg
Published September 23, 2015 in Reviews (1 comment)

Book Review: Travellers Without Tickets, Freedom and Equality at No Cost: A Social Experiment in Aubagne
Too often we feel trapped in conventional ways of thinking. Aubagne shows us to think first of the public good, and then get creative on how to achieve it.
by Nicholas Kevlahan
Published July 28, 2015 in Reviews (4 comments)

Review: Human Transit by Jarrett Walker
The author's goal is to give us confidence to form and advocate clear opinions about the kind of transit we want and how that can help create the kind of city we desire.
by Gerry Balt
Published June 24, 2015 in Reviews (4 comments)

Kongero Brings a Touch of Sweden to Hamilton
Kongero are a Swedish vocal group of four women who sing traditional-style Nordic music which they call 'Swedish Folkapella'.
by Mackenzie Kristjon Jenkyns
Published June 03, 2015 in Reviews (0 comments)

Hand to Mouth: Stark Poverty Memoir Challenges Middle-Class Sensibilities
While I was fairly familiar with the research into the causes and effects of poverty, Linda Tirado's narrative brought the day to day reality into stark relief.
by Jason Allen
Published January 23, 2015 in Reviews (4 comments)

Theatre Review: Romeo + Juliet
Stark, minimalist sets, strong acting, effective choreography and entertaining production combine to make this a performance definitely worth seeing.
by Mackenzie Kristjon Jenkyns
Published January 13, 2015 in Reviews (3 comments)

Review: A Very Leila Christmas
Etamadi inhabits Leila's character with such dedication, fluency and infectious charm that the audience can't help but be smitten with her naive self-confidence and her stumbles over the bizarre gotchas of Western culture.
by Ryan McGreal
Published December 21, 2014 in Reviews (1 comment)

Dead End: Suburban Sprawl and the Rebirth of American Urbanism by Benjamin Ross
Dead End is an engaging book, appropriately critical of sprawl without being sanctimonious and asking the right questions about why we continue to build sprawl when so many people prefer complete neighbourhoods.
by Rob Fiedler
Published November 17, 2014 in Reviews (28 comments)

Hamilton: Brutal Beauty, Hidden Heritage Guide
This book is highly recommended for a deeper understanding of Hamilton's developments and for giving context to local newspaper articles on current issues.
by Joy Jones
Published December 30, 2013 in Reviews (2 comments)

Best Albums of 2013
Here's a little slice of the music pie I ate in 2013.
by Michael Borrelli
Published December 30, 2013 in Reviews (9 comments)

Review: The Hamilton Book of Everything
For this new Hamiltonian, the Hamilton Book of Everything is a compact, helpful guide and resource to a city filled with unexpected treasures.
by Joy Jones
Published November 07, 2013 in Reviews (9 comments)

Baranga's On the Beach: This Ain't No Beach-Side Hut
Expansive vistas, large patio ambiance, pleasant service and great food make for a great experience at a classic Hamilton establishment.
by Margaret Lindsay Holton
Published May 16, 2013 in Reviews (13 comments)

The New Ben Thanh Has Restored Our Faith
The new restaurant location on James North gets everything right - location, decor, service, and of course the magnificent food.
by Ryan McGreal
Published March 26, 2013 in Reviews (21 comments)

Shoulder to the Wheel
As Labour Day draws near, I propose some post-summer reading to ease the transition, three books about, naturally, work - but work in the ever-green fields of utopian speculation.
by Shawn Selway
Published August 30, 2012 in Reviews (4 comments)

Review: Detours by Thought Beneath Film
Detours is a welcome and encouraging milestone for a band that aims to say something important in a musical language of catchy hooks, warm vocals and thick, gutsy rhythm.
by Ryan McGreal
Published July 27, 2012 in Reviews (6 comments)

Review: Celebration Rock by Japandroids
Over these eight tracks, the boys stay true to the mythical spirit of rock: simple, loud, yet unforgettable songs that glamourize the vitality of youth.
by Michael Borrelli
Published July 18, 2012 in Reviews (1 comment)

Cirque du Soleil: Dralion at Copps Coliseum
Dralion is a study in exuberance and dazzling verticality: a thematic melange that strings together one superlative performance after another.
by Ryan McGreal
Published April 26, 2012 in Reviews (6 comments)

Review: Karolina's Restaurant
Homey ambiance, friendly service and generous portions of delicious, home-cooked Polish cuisine make Karolina's a winner.
by Ryan McGreal
Published January 30, 2012 in Reviews (7 comments)

Stories in Stone: Travels through Urban Geology
This book is an eminently readable introduction to the history of North American building stones, and several chapters are of direct relevance to the 'urban geology' of southern Ontario.
by Gerard V. Middleton
Published January 25, 2012 in Reviews (5 comments)

Walk Off The Earth
The moments we shine are the ones where we have forgotten that people are watching, when we are just 'us' doing the things we do because we love to do them.
by Larry Pattison
Published January 09, 2012 in Reviews (11 comments)

Best Independent Music of 2011
With the calendar year fast approaching its end, we are happy to share a dozen of our favourite independent albums of the past year.
by Megan Platts and Michael Borrelli
Published December 22, 2011 in Reviews (10 comments)

Review: The End of Growth by Richard Heinberg
The future of cites will rest on their ability to change economic thinking patterns that have only benefited the top few percent of corporate executives.
by Maggie Hughes
Published August 22, 2011 in Reviews (21 comments)

Book Review: The Spirit Level by Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett
Fighting inequality could accomplish far more to reduce violence and unrest and cost less than imprisoning ever-larger numbers of the poor.
by Michael Borrelli
Published August 11, 2011 in Reviews (10 comments)

Album Review: Hollow by Cut Off Your Hands
If an eighties band had a sensitive, slightly flat baritone singer (and which ones didn't?), you'll hear their influences percolating up throughout this album.
by Ryan McGreal
Published August 05, 2011 in Reviews (3 comments)

Movie Reviews: Roadhouse and Valhalla Rising
From ripped throats and roadhouse blues to one-eyed warriors and holy quests: what's not to like?
by Matthew Van Allen
Published July 18, 2011 in Reviews (1 comment)

Oh, Hell by Little Foot Long Foot
This is what psychedelic blues rock would sound like if it was performed by an angry band of classically-trained, straightedge punks.
by Ryan McGreal
Published June 23, 2011 in Reviews (6 comments)

Cirque du Soleil: Quidam at Copps Coliseum
In Quidam, the performers continue to push the limits of strength and balance, but their demonstrations are more exercises in restraint and control than death-defying abandon.
by Ryan McGreal
Published June 09, 2011 in Reviews (7 comments)

Bittergirl, Grateful Man
Bittergirl is the cleverly intertwined tale of three women playing off one male actor, who represents all their exes and excesses.
by Kevin Somers
Published February 25, 2011 in Reviews (10 comments)

Three Music Reviews: Carmen Townsend, Common Grackle, Theset
I've been feeling guilty lately about not having time to write reviews of the new music I've received.
by Ryan McGreal
Published February 08, 2011 in Reviews (4 comments)

12ish More Days of Movies
Albert DeSantis serves up another generous helping in his increasingly inaccurately named 12ish Days series of movie reviews.
by Albert DeSantis
Published December 20, 2010 in Reviews (1 comment)

20 Solid Albums from 2010
Here we provide you with a short list of 20 solid albums from 2010 that might make good gifts for the music lover in your life.
by Michael Borrelli
Published December 17, 2010 in Reviews (14 comments)

12ish Days of Movies
Albert DeSantis watches bad movies so you don't have to. Sometimes he also watches good movies. This selection of reviews contains plenty of both.
by Albert DeSantis
Published December 08, 2010 in Reviews (0 comments)

Album Review: Treats, by Sleigh Bells
Certain albums take a genre we know well and morph it into the thing we suddenly realized we always wanted it to be. Treats is such an album.
by Mark Fenton
Published May 17, 2010 in Reviews (2 comments)

Three Elm Street Nightmares
What sets this series apart from standard slasher flicks are the fantastical elements and trippy dream-visuals, bending the rules of what is "real". I wouldn't call them instant classics, but its distinctive flavour is probably why Freddy became a pop cul
by Albert DeSantis
Published May 03, 2010 in Reviews (0 comments)

Clash of the Titans (1981 Original)
Clash of the Titans has a bit of a rustic charm, and the often-creepy stop-motion does look impressive even if it is past its prime.
by Albert DeSantis
Published April 05, 2010 in Reviews (11 comments)

Best Picture Nominees I Haven't Seen Yet Part 2 of 2: An Education And Precious
An Education inverts the romance/coming of age story, while Precious straddles the line between gritty realism and cliche.
by Albert DeSantis
Published March 15, 2010 in Reviews (0 comments)

Best Picture Nominees I Haven't Seen Yet, Part 1 Of 2: A Serious Man and The Blind Side
One of these films is very dark and very weird, but also unique. The other has Sandra Bullock in it. Take your pick which one is better.
by Albert DeSantis
Published March 15, 2010 in Reviews (15 comments)

Slap Shot is a Bona-fide Classic
Slap Shot is a funny way to get reacquainted with the game of hockey and Paul Newman in his prime. Despite the film's age there's a real sense of timelessness to it, regardless of when it's set.
by Albert DeSantis
Published February 20, 2010 in Reviews (2 comments)

The Late Shift: Worth a Second Look
With the hullabaloo about the late night NBC Leno/Conan shuffle there is a feeling of déjà vu. Late night TV fans will probably remember this whole thing happened before in the early 1990s when Johnny Carson stepped down from the "The Tonight Show".
by Albert DeSantis
Published February 20, 2010 in Reviews (0 comments)

Review: Bistro Parisien
Excellent food, charming service, and attractive space conspire to make Bistro Parisien a uniformly delightful dining experience.
by Ryan McGreal
Published January 25, 2010 in Reviews (14 comments)

Blood Guts Bruises Cuts by The Dudes
Classic rock at its finest: hard without being aggressive, beautiful without being pretty, and so bristling with hooks that you can't help but get stuck on it.
by Ryan McGreal
Published December 04, 2009 in Reviews (2 comments)

Review: 'Islands Disappear' by Said the Whale
I defy anyone to listen to it and not come away feeling refreshed and even inspired by Said the Whale's youthful charm, optimism and energy.
by Ryan McGreal
Published October 08, 2009 in Reviews (1 comment)

The Fast Romantics: Self-Titled Album
Frankly, I'm astonished that no other band had already scooped up this band name, which immediately and unmistakeably evokes exactly those musical influences that the band works so hard to channel.
by Ryan McGreal
Published August 27, 2009 in Reviews (2 comments)

Assemble Head in Sunburst Sound: When Sweet Sleep Returns
The dynamic tension between the band's space rock tendencies and the tight song structures that bound those tendencies makes for a taught, energetic listen.
by Ryan McGreal
Published August 27, 2009 in Reviews (0 comments)

Cirque du Soleil: Alegria at Copps Coliseum
Alegria is a masterpiece of sweeping, operatic live music, interpretive dance, ballet, acrobatics, gymnastics, and stupefying feats of strength, coordination and timing.
by Ryan McGreal
Published July 30, 2009 in Reviews (3 comments)

Album Review: Hunting Ghosts (& Other Collected Shorts) by Library Voices
Library Voices bring tight, skillful musical chops to bear in putting together a more polished sound rich in crisp melodies, complex rythms and interesting chord progressions.
by Ryan McGreal
Published July 21, 2009 in Reviews (0 comments)

Album Review: Harsh Words by Little Foot Long Foot
Harsh Words is a great collection of unpretentious bluesy rockers that will add a much-needed dose of ass-kicking to your summer music tracklist.
by Ryan McGreal
Published June 02, 2009 in Reviews (0 comments)

Going Steady by Rah Rah
Rah Rah seethe with passion and intensity and sincerity, and their music correspondingly kicks all kinds of ass.
by Ryan McGreal
Published April 30, 2009 in Reviews (1 comment)

24-Hour Film Fest
With the glitz of high-tech effects out of the equation, this film festival comes down to simple storytelling, fine acting and solid film making skills.
by Amy Kenny
Published April 01, 2009 in Reviews (0 comments)

Book Review: Autophobia, by Brian Ladd (University of Chicago Press, 2009)
We who live in Hamilton know that the traffic-engineering view of the world dies hard. Ladd recognizes this reality. He does not rail against it; nor does he accept it.
by David Cohen
Published March 20, 2009 in Reviews (4 comments)

The Best of the Tobacco Chew Spit: Seven Overlooked Westerns
No man is complete without the Western film. And you have to hand it to the Western: in most cases you can guarantee what you're going to get.
by Matthew Van Allen
Published March 19, 2009 in Reviews (0 comments)

Think Globally Eat Locally: Tapestry Bistro
It's not health food, exactly, but sensible preparation techniques and imaginatively presented ingredients create a series of sensational taste experiences with every visit.
by Karen Burson
Published February 11, 2009 in Reviews (1 comment)

Album Review: Neveroddoreven by Theset
Theset treads the well-worn paths of Canadian alternative/power pop, sounding by turns like Our Lady Peace and Matthew Good Band, though they stir a more aggressive punk sensibility into the music.
by Ryan McGreal
Published February 11, 2009 in Reviews (0 comments)

Unjust Deserts, by Gar Alperovitz and Lew Daly
Unjust Deserts is an important, timely book, and its publication should ignite a far-ranging discussion about just what it means to earn wealth.
by Ryan McGreal
Published January 08, 2009 in Reviews (15 comments)

Fisher Delivers During Live Recording
There's no pretense here, just solid songwriting. In sickness and in health, Fisher delivers.
by Amy Kenny
Published November 04, 2008 in Reviews (0 comments)

Album Review: Jackson Square by Arkells
Hard-hitting, melodic, bluesy rock with crisp guitars, driving bass and bombastic drums: hot damn, these guys are good!
by Ryan McGreal
Published November 04, 2008 in Reviews (2 comments)

Three Movies and a Restaurant
Ben got to enjoy (or not) these little treats last week as he took some time off work.
by Ben Bull
Published November 04, 2008 in Reviews (0 comments)

Ubiquitous Synergy Seeker - Welding the C:/
The organic folk sensibility blends smoothly with the jagged electronic beats and samples to produce a surprisingly fresh hybrid.
by Ryan McGreal
Published June 05, 2008 in Reviews (1 comment)

The Diving Bell and the Melting Paraiso: Two Reviews and a Bridge
Cerebral misadventure meets cerebral faux-krautrock.
by Mark Fenton
Published April 30, 2008 in Reviews (0 comments)

Urban Meltdown
In his new book, Clive Doucet argues that we have the knowledge and public will to address environmental issues. The problem is our politics.
by Bob Wood
Published February 14, 2008 in Reviews (3 comments)

The Shock Doctrine, by Naomi Klein
Powerful elites leverage "shock" events to catch people off guard and then implement unpopular economic policies to their benefit and the detriment of local communities.
by Ted Mitchell
Published November 08, 2007 in Reviews (13 comments)

Summer Reading Revisited
Ben reviews three books: Marilyn Meyers' Through Fire and Sea, John King's Headhunters, and Ewan McGregor and Charley Boorman's Long Way Round.
by Ben Bull
Published September 09, 2007 in Reviews (3 comments)

Why Ives?
Jeffrey Stewart responds to Mark Fenton's review of Charles Ives' Symphony No. 4
by Jeffrey Stewart
Published June 27, 2007 in Reviews (1 comment)

Charles Ives, Symphony No. 4
There is in Ives' music a man who holds sacred all the values of the Union, and at the same time a man who wants to subvert it all.
by Mark Fenton
Published June 07, 2007 in Reviews (2 comments)

The Coming Economic Collapse
An economist shares ways to profit from the coming economic collapse he believes will be triggered by declining global oil production.
by Trey Shaughnessy
Published April 30, 2007 in Reviews (14 comments)

The Good The Bad And The Queen
Matt reviews the Self-titled album and the live show (The Kool House, March 11, 2007).
by Matthew Van Allen
Published April 10, 2007 in Reviews (0 comments)

Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan (2006)
Whether you're laughing or choking at Borat's dialogue, some sort of a reaction is coming out of you!
by Matthew Van Allen
Published April 10, 2007 in Reviews (1 comment)

Patrick Watson: Close to Paradise
Patrick Watson's music is so rich, so substantial, so very sensual that it fairly begs to be compared to fine wine or hearty, Mediterranean cuisine.
by Ryan McGreal
Published March 19, 2007 in Reviews (2 comments)

Leonard Cohen: I'm Your Man (2005)
More an homage than a biography, I'm Your Man is essential if you're a Cohen fan, but is probably not the best place to start.
by Matthew Van Allen
Published February 26, 2007 in Reviews (1 comment)

Sky Dragon Centre
Sky Dragon is one of the most valuable 'artistic' hangout areas this city has to offer. I can think of no better place to deliver one's message.
by Matthew Van Allen
Published February 26, 2007 in Reviews (0 comments)

Pan's Labyrinth (2006)
Guillermo del Toro's world is the world of child - with hands ready to cover eyes and all.
by Matthew Van Allen
Published February 09, 2007 in Reviews (1 comment)

The Trouble With Diversity
America is currently obsessed with promoting diversity at the expense of, and as a diversion to, the fact of massive and growing economic inequality.
by Ted Mitchell
Published January 24, 2007 in Reviews (0 comments)

I'm Gretzky, You're Gretzky
Part dystopian satire, part romance, this book made me laugh out loud.
by Ryan McGreal
Published January 24, 2007 in Reviews (1 comment)

The Hanging of Angelique
Afua Cooper's thorough research is matched by her amazing writing, which puts the story together in a perfect timeline that keeps the reader wanting to know what happened next.
by Trey Shaughnessy
Published January 10, 2007 in Reviews (2 comments)

Vice Guide to Travel (2006)
The Vice Guide to Travel is so refreshingly good that I feel like I'm catching up with a college ally who has matured past fourth year.
by Matthew Van Allen
Published January 10, 2007 in Reviews (0 comments)

Jackass Number 2
Please don't think Matt's a jackass because he reviewed this movie.
by Matthew Van Allen
Published January 10, 2007 in Reviews (1 comment)

Better Off: Flipping the Switch on Technology
In our technology-obsessed culture, too much is almost enough. How much do we really need?
by Ryan McGreal
Published December 13, 2006 in Reviews (3 comments)

Art School Confidential and An Inconvenient Truth
Matt Van Allen reviews a new rental about greed, envy, rejection, acceptance, and love, and also a film about art school.
by Matthew Van Allen
Published December 13, 2006 in Reviews (0 comments)

The Proposition (2005)
This gritty period piece explores the slavery and colonization of Australia's aboriginal people while hewing to the form of the great western.
by Matthew Van Allen
Published November 23, 2006 in Reviews (0 comments)

The Notorious Bettie Page (2005)
Despite some pulled punches, Mary Harron's comic-inspired biopic captures the naïve yet sultry mystery of the notorious pin-up model.
by Matthew Van Allen
Published November 08, 2006 in Reviews (0 comments)

New Hamilton Spectator Format
I'm used to getting something with substance on the front page. Now, just when a story seems to be getting somewhere , it ends with no insight or further depth.
by Jason Leach
Published October 20, 2006 in Reviews (12 comments)

Peak Oil Paradigm Shift: The Urgent Need for a Sustainable Energy Model
Instead of a doomsday scenario, Peak Oil Paradigm Shift author Bilaal Abdullah paints a possible future without oil and energy wars.
by Trey Shaughnessy
Published March 18, 2006 in Reviews (1 comment)

It's a Sprawl World After All
It doesn't make a strong case connecting violence to sprawl, but this book does a great job of offering concrete solutions.
by Ryan McGreal
Published March 01, 2006 in Reviews (1 comment)

YaMan Restaurant
YaMan is sure to become a favourite lunch and dinner spot for downtown residents.
by Jason Leach
Published January 27, 2006 in Reviews (0 comments)

Ecocities: Building Cities in Balance with Nature
This book is every bit as rich, dense, and lush as the proposed development that bears its name.
by Ryan McGreal
Published December 14, 2005 in Reviews (0 comments)

Review: A Short History of Progress
Humans share a long history of fouling our nests and moving on. What happens when there's nowhere left to go?
by Ben Bull
Published November 28, 2005 in Reviews (4 comments)

Waking Up from the American Dream: A Review of Sprawl Kills
Joel Hirschhorn spreads the word about the dangers of sprawl and encourages people to demand healthy places to live.
by Ryan McGreal
Published September 15, 2005 in Reviews (0 comments)

Cafe on the Bay
The menu at Café on the Bay puts the focus right where it belongs - health and taste.
by Jason Leach
Published June 16, 2005 in Reviews (1 comment)

Room Forty One
From the moment we walked in the door to the time we left, we thoroughly enjoyed our experience at Room Forty One.
by Jason Leach
Published May 31, 2005 in Reviews (0 comments)

Art Gallery of Hamilton
It is impossible to walk through this new gallery and not be proud to live in Hamilton.
by Jason Leach
Published May 31, 2005 in Reviews (0 comments)

Tivoli Redevelopment Options Review
Trevor Shaw appraises the four current proposals for redeveloping the Tivoli and offers some suggestions.
by Trey Shaughnessy
Published April 04, 2005 in Reviews (2 comments)

Books About Hamilton
Here's a short list of books about Hamilton.
by Trey Shaughnessy
Published March 14, 2005 in Reviews (2 comments)

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