Comment 122632

By RobF (registered) | Posted March 20, 2018 at 11:55:45 in reply to Comment 122621

Jason, there is nothing NIMBY about setting a height limit at 30 storeys. The maximum height in the current downtown secondary plan is 12 storeys, I think. That we have buildings above that is true, but not overly relevant.

We can argue about the merits of a height limit ... i understand the practical logic from a land-use planning perspective of setting height limits, but I'm not opposed to taller buildings, per se. My references to Vancouver are to suggest that their debate and rules have evolved over time to adjust to changing circumstances.

The problem is a practical/legal one ... our planning regime, especially under the old OMB land-use appeal framework, means that any prior (especially recent) decision is used by proponents to justify their application. I understand the logic that Brad Lamb is applying that hey we could build a really ugly 20 storey box that maximizes our density permissions, but we'd like to build something a bit more slender and stylish and need height to do it. If that is the debate then let's have it. But let's start with some honesty ... we don't know what his bottom line is, because we don't know what he paid for the land and we don't know how difficult it is for him to sell the units and finance the construction.

Height limits can be NIMBY if they preclude reasonable development from happening ... but that is quite different than this. He could build a stylish tower under the incoming DTSP framework. Just not two towers and not to the height he is proposing. He's a businessman. He's trying to get the best deal for Brad Lamb. Nothing wrong with that. I don't work for him. I want the best deal with us ... downtown residents and the City as whole. Just arguing that we should approve whatever a proponent pitches because that's intensification is a recipe for problems.

Comment edited by RobF on 2018-03-20 11:57:30

Permalink | Context

Events Calendar

Recent Articles

Article Archives

Blog Archives

Site Tools

Feeds