Comment 105489

By kevlahan (registered) | Posted October 21, 2014 at 12:20:58 in reply to Comment 105488

http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liste_des_t...

How many of these cities have populations greater than 750,000? Answer: only a handful. The vast majority have total urban area populations far smaller than Hamilton.

Oh, but France is somehow completely irrelevant for "North America" (but we're talking about Canada here). Actually not:

http://bettercities.net/article/new-fren...

And, Canadian rates of driving and licensed vehicles per capita are actually much closer to Europe than to the USA:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_vehicles_per_capita https://www.fhwa.dot.gov/ohim/onh00/bar4...

And what were the populations of Calgary and Edmonton when they started building their LRT systems? About 10-15% smaller than Hamilton's:

"The population was just over 445,000 when the route first started construction in 1974." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edmonton_Li...

The population of Calgary was about 470,000 in 1976 and construction of their system began in 1977.

We don't need to guess about whether LRT can be successful in cities similar in size to Hamilton (and whether there would be "traffic chaos"). We have plenty of examples, including two right here in Canada.

And the land use study, Environmental Assessment and 30% engineering design by Steer Davis Gleave http://www.steerdaviesgleave.com (top integrated consulting transportation engineers) show that it is feasible.

Of course if you are going to claim every single study by Metrolinx, various consulting engineers, city staff, various independent institutes and the McMaster Institute for Transportation and Logistics are falsified, inept or done by unqualified people it is difficult to have any meaningful discussion.

There is definitely no conspiracy to force LRT onto an unsuspecting public: this has been (by far) the most studied, designed and publicly consulted infrastructure project in Hamilton's history!

Comment edited by kevlahan on 2014-10-21 12:30:07

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